Submit Your Product

Types of Learning Management Systems (2022) | What Are The Different Types Of LMS | Explained and Compared

Affiliate Disclosure: When you buy through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission. Learn more

In recent years, the Learning Management System (LMS) has become an increasingly popular tool for educators. An LMS is a software application that helps to plan, implement, and assess learning activities.

There are many different types of LMSs available, each with its own unique features and capabilities. When choosing the Best Learning Management Systems, you must first have a clear idea of the types of LMS available in the market.

You aren’t alone when dealing with difficulties while comparing the different parts of your LMS. Therefore, we’ve offered some guidance here so you can differentiate the major types of Learning Management Systems to help you get closer to making the wisest choice.

The most popular types of LMSs are listed below.

So let’s get started.

Types of Learning Management Systems

Some of the most popular types of LMS are as follows:

👉 Installed LMS Software vs Web-based LMS

Installed LMS Software

An installed learning management system (LMS) is a software application that is installed on a server. It is typically used by organizations that need to provide training to large groups of users. Installed LMSs are usually more expensive than cloud-based LMSs, but they offer more control and flexibility.

If you are considering an installed LMS for your organization, it is important to consider your needs and budget. Some features you may want to look for include: support for multiple languages, the ability to integrate with other software applications, and scalability.

Web-based LMS

Web-based Learning Management Systems (LMS) are systems that allow users to access and manage their learning content and progress online.

The specialty of online learning management systems is that it mainly works through the browser. It is forwarded to your browser or your webcomic service via the web. LMS software vendors handle their software and update, enhance, and sustain it continually. Online LMS software generally costs very little or something similar to installed LMS software.

Web-based LMSs provide a convenient and accessible way for users to engage with their learning content, track their progress, and receive feedback.

It offers many benefits for both learners and educators, including the ability to customize learning experiences, create engaging and interactive content, and assess learner progress.

The key difference between Installed LMS software vs Web-based LMS

Installed LMS software can only be accessed on-site where it was installed. So for example, if your school or office installed LMS software, it could be only accessed at those locations. So as a teacher, or a trainer, you can only teach classes on-site. This is rather inconvenient for students also as it does not facilitate flexible learning from any other location thereby impacting both content engagement and software adoption.

Web-based LMS provides added scope due to the fact that it can be used from anywhere so long as there is internet connectivity. Teachers or instructors can teach online and students can attend lessons from anywhere. LMS administrators can likewise access and control server functionality from anywhere in the world. As a result, web-based LMS provides much greater freedom.

Installed LMS vs Web-based LMS – In a NutShell

Installed LMS

Web-based LMS

Installed on your computers on-premise

Installed on the cloud infrastructure

Expensive > High set up fees, infrastructure costs, IT staff costs to be borne by the organization

Cost-Effective > This is economical if LMS is provided by a vendor who manages the application and services from cloud infrastructure to web-based delivery

LMS Updates and Upgrades have to be physically installed on all installations

LMS updates and upgrades are done centrally from the cloud. A single update is sufficient for rolling out changes to all users

Accessible only onsite

Accessible everywhere with an internet connection

The organization has to devote energy to Information technology services

The organization can focus solely on learning and development through LMS

Lack of flexibility in payment models

Flexible usage plans can be delivered with pay-as-per-user

This will be more time consuming to configure or change services, features, or users

Ramp up and Ramp down of services, features, and users can be done centrally with ease

Trainers and students have to be onsite

Trainers and students can be based anywhere and can access the LMS with an internet connection.

👉 Hosted LMS vs SaaS LMS

Hosted LMS (Learning Management Systems)

A hosted LMS is a learning management system that is delivered through the web. Hosted LMSs are usually subscription-based, with a monthly or yearly fee. They are often used by small and medium businesses that don’t have the resources to set up their own LMS.

There are many benefits of using a hosted LMS. One of the biggest advantages is that you don’t need to worry about hosting fees, maintenance, or upgrades – all of which can be expensive. Another benefit is that you can access your LMS from anywhere in the world, as long as you have an internet connection.

If you’re considering using a hosted LMS, it’s important to do your research and choose a reputable provider. Some things to look for include: pricing, features, customer support, and reviews from other users.

SaaS LMS

SaaS LMS is a cloud-based learning management system. It is a software-as-a-service model that allows users to access and use the system via the internet. SaaS LMS is typically subscription-based, with users paying a monthly or annual fee.

SaaS LMS systems are popular among small and medium businesses, as they are easy to set up and use, and do not require any upfront investment in hardware or software. SaaS LMS systems are also scalable, so they can grow with your business.

Some of the features you can expect from a SaaS LMS include course creation and management tools, student tracking and reporting, eCommerce integration, mobile compatibility, and more.

👉 Open-source LMS vs Closed source LMS

Open-source LMS

Open-source learning management systems (LMS) are a type of Learning Management system that allows users to create, manage and deliver educational content. Unlike proprietary LMSs, open-source LMSs are typically free to use and can be customized to fit the needs of any organization.

There are many benefits to using an open-source LMS. Perhaps the most significant benefit is that open-source LMSs can be easily customized to meet the specific needs of any organization. Additionally, because open-source LMSs are typically free to use, they can save organizations a significant amount of money when compared to proprietary LMSs.

If you’re looking for an LMS that is both flexible and affordable, an open-source LMS may be the perfect solution for your organization.

Closed Source Learning Management System

Closed source LMS is a Learning Management System that is not released under an open source license. This means that the software’s source code is not available for others to view or change. Closed source LMSs are usually developed by commercial companies, and they typically charge for licenses and/or per-user fees. Some popular closed-source LMSs include Blackboard Learn, Canvas, and Moodle.

There are several advantages to using a closed source LMS. First, it can be easier to get support from the vendor when problems arise. Second, vendors of closed source LMSs often invest more in research and development than open source projects, which can result in a more polished product. Finally, closed source LMSs typically have more features than their open source counterparts.

Some of the major advantages offered by open-source LMS include the following:

  • You can select and control all LMS features on your content page, even though commercial LMS may offer upgrades to their products or disable old features at will.
  • Open-source LMS gives you the liberty and flexibility you need to tailor your content. That is a large advantage that the open-source neighborhood provides. You have complete layout and customization versatility. You control your data and this might be essential for purposes of privacy and security legislation legislated like GDPR, as well as the rise in privacy concerns.
  • Open-source e-learning systems can allow you to set up and schedule priority features and releases as opposed to waiting for them to be offered by a commercial supplier. Commercial vendors can wait for a while until customers request a specific feature.

👉 Free LMS vs Commercial LMS

Free LMS

Free LMSs are a good option for those on a tight budget. While they may not be as feature-rich as commercial LMSs, they can still provide a basic platform for delivering e-learning content. The main downside of free LMSs is that they can be less reliable and more difficult to use.

Commercial LMS

Commercial LMSs are usually more comprehensive and offer more features than free LMSs. They also tend to be more user-friendly and easier to navigate. However, they can be quite expensive, which may not be feasible for some schools or businesses.

The Key Difference between Free LMS vs Commercial LMS

There are many different types of learning management systems (LMS) available on the market today. Two of the most popular choices are free LMS and commercial LMS. So, which one is right for your organization?

Free LMS systems are typically open-source software that can be downloaded and installed on your own servers. Commercial LMS systems are usually hosted by the provider and accessed via a web browser. Both have their pros and cons, so it’s important to weigh your options carefully before making a decision.

One of the main advantages of free LMS is that there is no upfront cost. You can try out the software and see if it meets your needs before deciding whether or not to invest in a commercial solution. However, free LMS systems often lack the features and functionality of their commercial counterparts.

👉 LMS with Course creation vs Non-course creation LMS

LMS with Course creation

An LMS is a learning management system that can be used to deliver courses and track learner progress. Many LMSs have features for creating and managing courses, making them valuable tools for educators. When choosing the best LMS, it is important to consider its course creation capabilities.

Most LMSs allow users to create and manage courses, but the features and tools vary from system to system. Some LMSs have drag-and-drop course builders that make it easy to create and customize courses. Other systems provide more flexibility, allowing users to add their own code or integrate with third-party applications.

When choosing an LMS, consider its course creation capabilities to ensure that it meets your needs. Drag-and-drop builders may be ideal for simple courses, while more flexible systems may be better for complex or custom content.

Non-course creation LMS

An LMS that does not allow for the creation of courses may seem like a limited tool, but there are many benefits to using this type of system. For one, a non-course creation LMS can be less expensive than a system that offers course creation features. Additionally, a non-course creation LMS can be easier to use and manage, since there is no need to create and manage courses.

👉 Integration capable LMS vs Non-integrated LMS

Integration capable LMS

An integration-capable LMS is a Learning Management System that can connect with other software applications and platforms. This type of system is beneficial for organizations because it allows them to manage their learning content and data in one central location.

An integration-capable LMS also provides organizations with the ability to customize their learning environment to meet their specific needs. Additionally, an integration-capable LMS can help organizations save time and money by reducing the need for duplicate data entry and manual processes.

Non-integrated LMS

There are a number of reasons why you might want to consider a non-integrated Learning Management System (LMS). First, if you’re looking for a more affordable option, a non-integrated LMS may be the way to go.

Second, if you’re not concerned about having the latest and greatest features, a non-integrated LMS may be just what you need. Finally, if you’re looking for something that’s more customizable and flexible, a non-integrated LMS may be the right choice for you.

Matrix Chart Of All LMS Types vs Features

Type of LMS

Installed on computers

Cloud-hosted

Cost-effective

Easy upgrades

Need for in-house IT team

Installed LMS

Web-hosted LMS

Open Source LMS

Commercial LMS

Conclusion On Types Of Learning Management Systems

So, we have discussed and examined the different types of Learning Management Systems. LMSs have advanced from being individually installed machines to LMSs being hosted on the cloud and available across numerous devices. You have to choose an LMS by considering the long-term result. Free LMSs need tech support, while commercial LMSs are available without additional help.

Finding the right LMS depends on your organization’s plans for the span of rollout and future flexibility in e-learning initiatives and 3rd party integration with applications and social media. Whichever LMS you select, see that it is feature-rich, user-friendly, and capable to meet your training and learning goals now and in the future.

Hope you liked reading this post on Types Of Learning Management Systems. If you have any questions, you can leave them in the comment section below. I will be happy to respond.

Soumyajit Saha

Soumyajit Saha

Soumyajit is addicted to quality and has a passion for turning data into meaningful information. As a forward-thinking, technology-driven, and brilliantly creative software Analyst and Tester, he knows what it takes to ‘productize’ an IT solution or concept. Experienced in functional testing, quality testing, and front-end testing for Software Quality Assurance (SQA). Skilled at analyzing logs, generating thorough reports, and identifying any failures. Besides being a tech freak, he loves football and has a deep interest in Arts and Painting.

We will be happy to hear your thoughts

Leave a reply

RebelLink
Logo
Compare items
  • Total (0)
Compare
0